Obama: "I haven't said this publicly, so I've got to be careful here. You get a little looser in your last two years of office."
By Martin Hill
LibertyFight.com
December 5, 2014


ABOUT THIS SITE MOST RECENT ARTICLESRADIO INTERVIEWSVIDEOS
ZIONISM FREEMASONRYFILMING COPSFIGHTING TRAFFIC TICKETS
9/11= Inside Job VACCINES= POISONRED-LIGHT CAMERASEUGENICS=MURDER
NEW SECTION: CATHOLICISM LibertyFight.com CLASSICSHISTORICAL QUOTESALL WARS ARE BANKERS WARS!



President Obama warned of a "disquiet in the general public," an "undertow of pessimism" and "Americans feeling as if their wages and incomes have stagnated" during his speech Tuesday at the Business Roundtable.

He also quipped "I love signing bills" to an outburst of laughter from the crowd. There are many other gems from this speech and LibertyFight.com waded through it for you to find the best ones, including his comments on the topics of free trade, immigration, infrastructure repair, Putin's "backward-looking" nationalism, China "embarrassing" the U.S., "carbon emissions that cause climate change," and tax reform.

Obama began by boasting of "the best six-month period of economic growth in over a decade" but added "we've got a lot more progress to make." He noted that wages and incomes "certainly have not picked up the way they did in earlier generations" and that even as corporate "profits go up, wages and incomes have shrunk." Regarding outsourcing, Obama said "some of those same anti-trade impulses are more ascendant in the Republican Party than they might have been 20 years ago." He spoke of the need to "give the American people some confidence" and said "we're not going to get anything done in this town until we're able to describe to the average American worker how at some level this is improving their wages, it's giving them the ability to save for retirement, it's improving their financial security."

Obama noted that at the G20, "what was striking was the degree of optimism that the world felt about the American economy -- an optimism that in some ways is greater than how Americans sometimes feel about the American economy." He said he sought to "give the American people some confidence that those of us who have this extraordinary privilege of being placed in leadership are able,to actually deliver for the American people."


Here are some notable quotes, and below in the box is the full summary of relevant segments from the one hour thirty six minute speech, which included a Q&A from what Obama called "a lot of good corporate citizens in this room." The excerpts emphasized in bold and underlined text are of particular interest.

  • "I think the opportunities for American preeminence economically are very, very high.

  • "No one benefits by the government shutting down, and it is entirely unacceptable for us not to maintain the full faith and credit of the United States government."

  • "Democracy is messy, but it doesn't have to be chaos."

  • "I will say that's one of the frustrating things about Washington, is people are really good about hollering about problems, and then when we solve them nobody talks about them."

  • "I think some of the criticism of what we've been doing on the Trans-Pacific Partnership is groups fighting the last war as opposed to looking forward. And so that may be something discrete that we can get done if we're able to have a good, solid debate and everybody feels like it's been transparent..."

  • "And finally, on immigration, I think that's something that probably comes last. I suspect that temperatures need to cool a little bit in the wake of my executive action."


  • "Well, let me talk about economics... The United States stands out as an economy that's going strong at the moment."

  • "And we have -- I joke sometimes that I'm an honorary member of the European Commission -- and Jack certainly is, Tim Geithner before him ..."

  • "People continue to look to America for economic leadership."

  • "I'm less optimistic about Russia. I have a very direct, blunt and businesslike relationship with Putin. ...he has been improvising himself into a nationalist, backward-looking approach to Russian policy that is scaring the heck out of his neighbors and is badly damaging his economy."

  • Obama on China's infrastructure: "It's embarrassing -- you drive down the roads, and you look at what they're able to do."

    The White House
    Office of the Press Secretary
    For Immediate Release
    December 03, 2014
    Remarks by the President at the Business Roundtable Headquarters
    Washington, D.C.
    11:21 A.M. EST
    http://m.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/12/03/remarks-president-business-roundtable

    Let me just give you a sense of where I think our economy currently is, what's happening around the world and where I think it should be, and the chances for us here in Washington to accelerate rather than impede some of the progress that we've made.

    Around this time six years ago, America�s businesses were shedding about 800,000 jobs per month. Today, our businesses, including some of the most important businesses in the world that are represented here today, have created over 10.6 million new jobs; 56 months of uninterrupted job growth, which is the longest private sector job growth in our history. We just saw the best six-month period of economic growth in over a decade. For the first time in six years, the unemployment rate is under 6 percent.

    All told, the United States of America, over the last six years, has put more people back to work than Europe, Japan, and the rest of the advanced world combined. And that's a record for us to build on.


    ...And solar energy is up about tenfold; wind energy is up threefold. Unit costs for the production of clean energy are dropping down to where they're getting close to being competitive to fossil fuels. And as a consequence, we've also been able to reduce carbon emissions that cause climate change faster than most of the other industrialized countries.

    Andrew Liveris and I were talking -- I was with his people in Brisbane, Australia, and at the G20, what was striking was the degree of optimism that the world felt about the American economy -- an optimism that in some ways is greater than how Americans sometimes feel about the American economy.... Now folks want to put money back into this country.

    And a lot of that has to do with the fact that we've got the best workers in the world, we've got the best university system, and research and development and innovation in the world, and we've got the best businesses in the world. And so a lot of you can, I think, take great credit for the kind of bounce-back that we've seen over the last six years.

    Having said all that, I think we recognize that we've got a lot more progress to make. And I put it in a couple of categories. There are some common-sense things that we should be doing that we're not doing, and the reason primarily is because of politics and ideological gridlock. But I suspect that if we surveyed folks here, regardless of your party affiliation, you'd say, let's get this done.

    Tax reform -- an area which I know is of great interest to the Business Roundtable: I have consistently said that for us to have a system in which we have, on paper, one of the two or three highest tax rates in the world when it comes to corporate taxation, but in practice, there are so many loopholes that you get huge variations between what companies pay doesn't make sense. And we should be able to smooth the system out, streamline it in such a way that allows us to lower rates, close loopholes, and make for a much more efficient system where folks aren't wasting a lot of time trying to hire accountants and lawyers to get out of paying taxes, but have some certainty and were able to raise just as much money on a much simpler system. That's something that I think we should be doing


    ...And I think one of the habits that this town has to break is this notion that if you disagree on one thing, then suddenly everybody takes their ball home and they don't play. I think that there's got to be the capacity for us to say, here's an area where we're going to have some vigorous disagreement, but here are some areas where we have a common vision -- let's go ahead and get that done, and build some momentum, start working those muscles to actually legislate, sign some legislation, give the American people some confidence that those of us who have this extraordinary privilege of being placed in leadership are able,to actually deliver for the American people.

    But, domestically, the area where I have the deepest concern is the fact that although corporate profits are at the highest levels in 60 years, the stock market is up 150 percent, wages and incomes still haven't gone up significantly, and certainly have not picked up the way they did in earlier generations. That's part of what's causing disquiet in the general public even though the aggregate numbers look good.

    And one thing I'd like to work with the BRT on is to ask some tricky questions, but important questions, about how we can make sure that prosperity is broad-based. I actually think when you look at the history of this country, when wages are good and consumers feel like they've got some money in their pocket, that ends up being good for business, not bad for business. I think most of you would agree to that. And we've got a lot of good corporate citizens in this room; unfortunately, the overall trend lines, though, have been, even as productivity and profits go up, wages and incomes as a shared overall GDP have shrunk. And that's part of what is creating an undertow of pessimism despite generally good economic news

    a minimum tax globally that ensures that folks aren't gaming the system

    If we are, in fact, going to accomplish revenue-neutral corporate tax reform that substantially lowers the corporate rate, then we have to go after some deductions that people are very comfortable with. And there are going to be some winners and there are going to be some losers in the short term. Over the long term, there's going to be less distortion in the economy, and capital will be allocated more sensibly. But in the short term, there are going to be some winners and losers -- including in this room.

    The question then becomes, are folks willing and ready to go ahead and make that move for the sake of a simpler, more streamlined, more sensible tax system. Because, if not, it's not going to happen. All of you represented in this room have employees and businesses and plants all across the country in every congressional district, and if we don't have consistency and unity coming out of our top companies, then we're going to have -- I think the likelihood of us being able to get something done is low.


    My view is, is that if we start with the corporate side, it's a more discrete problem, fewer variables, fewer moving parts. We may be able to get that done, and then we can potentially have a conversation about broader tax reform. That may not be how the Republicans view the situation, and so that -- and that could end up being a hang-up

    The EITC, earned income tax credit -- hugely important for a lot of working families, something that has historically been supported on a bipartisan basis because it encourages work, but it says if you're working full-time we're going to try to do everything we can to make sure that you're not in poverty when you're doing the right thing and taking responsibility.

    So there are going to be some working-class and middle-class and working-family provisions that have to be incorporated if we are to extend some of these other tax deductions and tax breaks as well.

    But that, hopefully, gives you a sense of optimism on my part, but cautious optimism. I think that there are going to be some real challenges, but we are absolutely committed to working with Speaker Boehner and Mitch McConnell, as well as the BRT and other interests in seeing if we can get this thing done. I think the time is right. And you're right, Randall, that the window is not going to be open too wide and it's going to start narrowing the closer we get into the next presidential election -- which always seems to start the day after the last election

    THE PRESIDENT: I've been encouraged by recent statements by Speaker Boehner and Leader McConnell about their interest in preventing another government shutdown and I take them at their word.

    But the one thing I can say for certain is that no one benefits by the government shutting down, and it is entirely unacceptable for us not to maintain the full faith and credit of the United States government. And we just cannot afford to engage in that kind of brinksmanship that we saw over the last couple years. Each time that happened, consumer sentiment plunged. It was a self-inflicted wound and we had to dig ourselves back out of a hole, despite all the efforts that had been made, simply because people's confidence in the system overall was shaken. So my strong hope is, is that we don't repeat that.

    Democracy is messy, but it doesn't have to be chaos.

    I will say that's one of the frustrating things about Washington, is people are really good about hollering about problems, and then when we solve them nobody talks about them.


    I think I mentioned earlier that health care inflation has gone up at the slowest rate in 50 years, far slower than had been projected by CBO or by the actuaries for Medicare.

    As a consequence, we've already been able to book about $188 billion in savings over the next 10 years in reduced health care outlays. And I actually think that we can get more done as some of the delivery system reforms that we talked about and are initiating through the Affordable Care Act are put in place.

    I think the opportunities for American preeminence economically are very, very high.

    Q. And everyone in here wants to grow and everyone wants to add jobs, and we all want to raise pay -- believe it or not. It's what we want to do.
    THE PRESIDENT: Oh, I do believe it.

    With respect to trade, we hope to be able to not simply finalize an agreement with the various parties in the Trans-Pacific Partnership, but also to be able to explain it to the public, and to engage in all the stakeholders and to publicly engage with the critics, because I think some of the criticism of what we've been doing on the Trans-Pacific Partnership is groups fighting the last war as opposed to looking forward. And so that may be something discrete that we can get done if we're able to have a good, solid debate and everybody feels like it's been transparent and they understand exactly what it is that we're trying to do.

    And I've been exploring -- I had a conversation with Larry Fink a while back, and Larry has been bringing together some people to see how we can do more in attracting private investment into infrastructure construction -- which is done fairly effectively in a lot of other countries, but that's not been our tradition, so our tax structures and legal structures are not optimally designed to get private capital and infrastructure. But we're working on that. But I do think that if we are successful with tax reform that may give us an avenue for a one-time big push on infrastructure.

    And finally, on immigration, I think that's something that probably comes last. I suspect that temperatures need to cool a little bit in the wake of my executive action. Certainly, there will be pressure initially within Republican caucuses to try to reverse what I've done, despite the fact that what I'm doing I think is exactly the right thing to do. We have to prioritize how we allocate limited enforcement resources, and we should be focusing on felons; we should not be focusing on breaking up families who are our neighbors and our friends and whose kids go to school with us.


    My suspicion is they'll take a couple of stabs at rolling back what I've done,

    Then you could see an environment begin to emerge of productivity in Washington -- which would be exciting. I love signing bills. (Laughter.)

    Well, let me talk about economics...

    The United States stands out as an economy that's going strong at the moment

    And we have -- I joke sometimes that I'm an honorary member of the European Commission -- and Jack certainly is, Tim Geithner before him -- we have spent a lot of time trying to manage through various crises that pop up in Europe. And my concern is, is, is that because there's not a current financial crisis and the markets are relatively calm, that we're not paying enough attention to just the overall weakness of the European economy

    we were able to reduce our deficits in part because, yes, we raised some taxes

    people continue to look to America for economic leadership. We need some other engines to be pulling the global economy along and we're pursuing diplomatic policies and consultations to try to encourage that.

    I think they [China] have a very strong interest in maintaining good relations with the United States. ... We've got an integrated world economy and the two largest economies in the world have to have an effective relationship together.

    I'm less optimistic about Russia. I have a very direct, blunt and businesslike relationship with Putin. We had a very productive relationship when Medvedev was President, even though Putin was still the power behind the thrown. In part because I think the situation in Ukraine caught him by surprise, he has been improvising himself into a nationalist, backward-looking approach to Russian policy that is scaring the heck out of his neighbors and is badly damaging his economy. And sanctions are having a big bite on their economy.

    We continue to offer them a pathway to a diplomatic resolution of the problem. But the challenge is this is working for him politically inside of Russia, even though it is isolating Russia completely internationally. And I think people should take note of how unified we have been able to keep the Europeans on sanctions and penalizing Russia for its behavior, despite the fact that it's tough on the Russian economy -- or on the European economy. But people have recognized there's a core principle at stake that helped to establish peace in Europe and prosperity in Europe that can't be ignored.

    ...And finally, in the Middle East, you are going through a generational shift, a tectonic shift in the Middle East, and it is messy and it is dangerous. Part of it is sectarian schisms between Shia and Sunni, and conflicts between states that engage in proxy fights that are far more bloody and vicious and significant now than the conflict between Arabs and Jews. And you're seeing that primarily in Iraq and Syria.

    ... The longer-term problem in the Middle East is -- and this relates to the economy -- the whole region in some ways has gone down a blind alley where too often Islam is now equated with rejection of education, modernity, women's participation -- all the things that allow you to thrive in a modern economy. And that's not uniformly true, but too often those forces inside of Islam have been elevated, and moderate voices and voices that recognize Islam should be compatible with science, education, tolerance, openness, global commerce, productivity -- too often those voices have been silenced.

    So the question now becomes are we able to strengthen some of those voices. That is a generational problem. And some of the things we're doing, for example, are entrepreneurial summits for Muslim small business leaders, and that's the kind of thing that we want to continue to promote and where we thing the BRT can be very helpful.

    ...And there's a half-truth that is magnified I think in the discussions around trade that global competition has contributed to some of that wage stagnation. It's an appealing argument. I think when you look at the numbers, it's actually an incorrect argument that over time, growth, investment, exports all have increased the capacity for working families to improve their economic standing. But I say it's a half-truth because there's no doubt that some manufacturing moved offshore in the wake of China entering the WTO and as a consequence of NAFTA.


    Now, more of those jobs were lost because of automation and capital investment, but there's a narrative there that makes for some tough politics. We have to be able to talk directly to the public about why trade is good for America, good for American businesses and good for American workers. And we have to dispel some of the myths.

    ... Part of the argument that I'm making to Democrats is, don't fight the last war -- you already have. If somebody is wanting to outsource, if any of the companies here wanted to locate in China, you've already done it. If you wanted to locate in a low-wage country with low labor standards and low environmental standards, there hasn't been that much preventing you from doing so. And, ironically, if we are able to get Trans-Pacific Partnership done, then we're actually forcing some countries to boost their labor standards, boost their environmental standards, boost transparency, reduce corruption, increase intellectual property protection. And so all that is good for us

    ... So I think that there are folks in my own party and in my own constituency that have legitimate complaints about some of the trend lines of inequality, but are barking up the wrong tree when it comes to opposing TPP, and I'm going to have to make that argument.

    But I will tell you, though, when you talk to Boehner and McConnell, that some of those same anti-trade impulses are more ascendant in the Republican Party than they might have been 20 years ago as well. And some of you may have encountered those in some of your conversations. And this was why it goes back to the point -- we're not going to get trade done, we're not going to get infrastructure done, we're not going to get anything done in this town until we're able to describe to the average American worker how at some level this is improving their wages, it's giving them the ability to save for retirement, it's improving their financial security.

    ...If people continue to feel like Democrats are looking after poor folks and Republicans are looking after rich folks and nobody is looking after me, then we don't get a lot of stuff done. And the trend lines evidence the fact that folks have gotten squeezed. And obviously, 2007, 2008 really ripped open for people how vulnerable they were.

    Q. "...how do you see the progress that's been made and what you anticipate occurring in the next couple of years relative to removing some of this regulatory burden that makes us all uncompetitive?

    THE PRESIDENT: I think it's a great question. It's probably a good place to close because I think this is an area where I'd like to see us do more together.

    I've said before to my staff -- I haven't said this publicly, so I've got to be careful here. You get a little looser in your last two years of office. (Laughter.) And this is a little tongue-in-cheek, but it will get to a point. The Republicans -- and maybe I'd throw the BRT in here -- are actually about 25 percent right when it comes to regulatory burden. Now, you say the numbers are different. But what I mean by that is nobody wants to be regulated, and there are some regulations that are burdensome on businesses. They'd rather not do them, but the common good that is served is sufficiently important, the benefits so outweigh the cost that, as a society, we should go ahead and do them.


    ...And we were talking about China earlier. I would just point to one simple example, and that is you would not want your kids growing up in Beijing right now, because they could not breathe. And the fact of the matter is that used to be true in Los Angeles -- as recently as 1970. And the reason it changed was because of the Clean Air Act. And in my hometown of Chicago, the Chicago River caught fire right around the same period, and because of the Clean Water Act, you now have folks paddling down the water and fishing. And the commercial renaissance of downtown Chicago is, in large part, driven by a really big, radical piece of environmental legislation that, at the time, people said would destroy our businesses and our competitiveness

    You have regulations that squash innovation, because at times some of the agencies, the regulatory agencies treat every problem like a nail and only have a hammer, and aren't engaging with industry enough to think, all right, here is the problem we're trying to solve, is there's a smarter way of solving it.

    ...But are there some other institutional things we can do to build the process so, for example, there's more input on the front end rather than the rule gets promulgated, published, and then there's this big, cumbersome, inefficient, unwieldy process of comments. Are there smarter ways of doing that? We're spending a lot of time on the regulatory look-back process, digging back into old rules and seeing what don't make sense.

    I suspect there may be four or five regulations out of 20, 25 where you can persuade us, you know what, this actually should just be eliminated. It doesn't make sense anymore. Or it should be replaced. And we will be open to doing that.

    So we are open to common sense. And what I have assigned Jeff to do and my entire Cabinet to do -- Penny Pritzker and Tom Perez and others -- is to sit down, listen to you, and if you can show us either that something is counterproductive and doesn't work, or there's a smarter way of meeting the goal, we will embrace it, happily

    ...And we now do have probably the safest workforce that we've ever had in history. Made huge strides on that, partly because of just continuous improvement that you've instituted in your own companies. This has been good for workers. It's been good for business. But, frankly, if it hadn't been for some initial laws to prod you, some of it just wouldn't have happened.

    So we're going to hang on to worker safety rules. The question then is going to be, is there a way, for example, for us to enforce it in a more efficient way and a less disruptive way, but continues to hold you accountable. That's a conversation Tom Perez is going to be happy to have.

    All right? Happy holidays, everybody. It's good to be in America. God bless us. Thank you

    END 12:57 P.M. EST

    [Facebook does not allow links to my site. To post this article on Facebook, use this link: http://whatreallyhappened.com/content/obama-i-havent-said-publicly-so-ive-got-be-careful-here-you-get-little-looser-your-last-two-

    You can follow LibertyFight.com on Twitter and re-tweet this article here.

    Obama: "Ihaven't said this publicly, so I've got to be careful here. You get a little looser in your last two years" http://t.co/1pJNjVQcJ8

    — Martin (@LibertyFight) December 5, 2014


    Martin Hill is a Catholic paleoconservative and civil rights advocate. His work has been featured in the Los Angeles Daily News, San Gabriel Valley Tribune, The Orange County Register, KNBC4 TV Los Angeles, The Press Enterprise, LewRockwell.com, WhatReallyHappened.com, Infowars.com, PrisonPlanet.com, Economic Policy Journal, TargetLiberty.com, FreedomsPhoenix, Haaretz, TMZ, Veterans Today, Jonathan Turley blog, The Dr. Katherine Albrecht Show, National Motorists Association, AmericanFreePress.net, RomanCatholicReport.com, WorldNetDaily, HenryMakow.com, OverdriveOnline.com, Educate-Yourself.org, TexeMarrs.com, Dr. Kevin Barrett's Truth Jihad radio show, Strike-The-Root.com, Pasadena Weekly, ActivistPost.com, Los Angeles Catholic Lay Mission Newspaper, KFI AM 640, IamtheWitness.com, Redlands Daily Facts, SaveTheMales.ca, BlackBoxVoting, The Michael Badnarik Show, The Wayne Madsen Report, Devvy.com, Rense.com, FromTheTrenchesWorldReport.com, BeforeItsNews.com, The Contra Costa Times, Pasadena Star News, Silicon Valley Mercury News, Long Beach Press Telegram, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, L.A. Harbor Daily Breeze, CopBlock.org, DavidIcke.com, Whittier Daily News, KCLA FM Hollywood, The Fullerton Observer, Antiwar.com, From The Trenches World Report, and many others. Archives can be found at LibertyFight.com and DontWakeMeUp.Org.



    FAIR USE NOTICE: The above may be copyrighted material, and the use of it on LibertyFight.com may not have been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available on a non-profit basis for educational and discussion purposes only. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 USC S. 107. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.



    FAIR USE NOTICE: The above may be copyrighted material, and the use of it on LibertyFight.com may not have been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available on a non-profit basis for educational and discussion purposes only. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in 17 USC S. 107. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

    More links / Catholic Information:

    Obama: "Ihaven't said this publicly, so I've got to be careful here. You get a little looser in your last two years" http://t.co/1pJNjVQcJ8

    — Martin (@LibertyFight) December 5, 2014